Yes, it is the week successive to Labor Day… Oh how we lament the passing of yet another too-short summer. But! September means TIFF! Tonight is the opening night of this year’s Toronto International Film Festival. Above is the trailer for American Pastoral, which is world premiering tomorrow night at the fest; starring Ewan McGregor (also his directorial debut… no big deal), Jennifer Connelly, and Dakota Fanning. And yes, it’s based on the novel of the very same name by Philip Roth, but you already knew that, didn’t you. I’m going to be at the premiere of All I See Is You on Wednesday night, but oh, how I wish I could see this masterpiece above as well. I’m telling you, the trailer itself could win a short-film competition.

OK more to come in the following week. I’ll definitely do a review of All I See Is You. Happy festival season, everybody!

Is this the future of our food industry?

Chloé Rutzerveld’s Edible Growth project consists of 3D-printed shapes containing a mixture of seeds, spores and yeast, which will start to grow after only a few days.

“Edible growth is exploring how 3D printing could transform the food industry,” she says in the video above. “It is about 3D printing with living organisms, which will develop into a fully grown edible.”

Rutzerveld’s project is eye-opening to the general public in regards to what up-and-coming technology can be capable of. Some will decry such a process of cultivating and growing food, claiming that it isn’t “progress” and as “foodies”,  they “enjoy fresh products that are prepared with love and knowledge,” but I humbly disagree. Yes, food is an important part of many cultures, and nothing quite beats making a meal with someone you love, or enjoying a meal that a loved one has made for you. However, those claiming that 3D printing food is Frankensteinian fail to see the wonder that these little 3D printers can invoke.

This process of making edible foods isn’t meant to replace how we traditionally make our food. I see it as a study into what technology is more and more capable of doing — turning science fiction into science fact. Maybe it’ll hit the mainstream in 10 or so years; maybe it won’t. But if it does, it doesn’t mean that we must, or even should, forgo the process of cooking for 3D printing. When viewed simply as another accessible tool in the kitchen, an advanced mini-oven, if you will, Edible Growth’s technology is just another tool in our arsenal.

When I look at Chloé Rutzerveld’s project, I see knowledge in the fields of design and plant biology, devotion, experimentation, and beauty. And if you were to look into my eyes upon first learning of the technology behind Edible Growth, you would in turn see wonder.

Want to share your take on this issue/non-issue? Sound off in the comments below!